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I was trying to show off so been searching the internet for tricks I can absolutely apply to my guitar. Oh men then I found this blog https://musicadvisor.com/10-awesome-guitar-tricks-try/

I was laughing thinking that this will be easy but damn, I felt so stupid not getting all of them by just once or twice of a practice. 

So, any of you can do this in one practice? maybe for those who are really genius with their instruments :)

And my family specially my cousins ended up laughing at me.

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Bwahahahaa...

Over the decades have tried pretty much all of these... and many guitarists use them on a regular basis.  I don't think I'd have had the courage to try them in front of anyone on the first attemp; I prefer to practice in private and even performances (although I've done many) tend to make me nervous (I become hyper and over-talkative during performances-- the opposite of stage fright-- so I avoid them).   But you gave your friends some entertainment and fun laughing at (I prefer with) you... so you brought joy to people in the attempt.   And you'll improve with practice.  Win/win.

The tricks themselves come easy to some folks not so easy to others.  Almost all of them have degrees of skill.  For example, almost anyone can slide, but learning to slide well and knowing the best time to slide, that's another thing. But of all the CBG tricks, learning to use a slide well is in my opinion one of the most valuable if one wants that Delta Swamp sound.

Hammering, yeah that's a neat effect.  Easy to do, tricky to know when and how to do at the proper time. But once ya learn to hammer it opens up a whole new area of music.  The article talks about hammering with the right hand; hammering (or tapping) with the left hand on a good, sensitive guitar is even more valuable.  I've seen people play entire song sections with only the left (chording) hand, never picking a note with their right one.   That's not gonna happen on the first try. ;D

Octave skipping we do all the time; it's just that most players (except music theorists) never think about what they're doing.   6-string guitar tuning is actually designed to make both octave skipping and 3-5-7 combos easier.   One can octave skip on a CBG easily because with GDg tuning, two of the strings are already an octave apart.

Vibrato I use all the time, especially on slow or blues songs-- to the point I rarely (if ever) use a vibrato bar (even though most of my regular gits have one). 

String bending... awesome for CBG and 6-string alike, especially if one uses light-gauge strings (I recommend 9s instead of 10s, and definitely nothing above... too much work and hard on the fingertips).   Again it's a matter of where and when, but this kind of thing is really what makes a stringed instrument so much more versatile than say, a digital organ.  When we think about it, saxophonists "bend" notes all the time; that's what makes them sound good. 

Anyhow back to the question:    Have I tried all these?  Over the years, yes.   Did I master them first try?  Some of them came easy, some of them I don't really use to this day.    But I have to say it's a pretty good list of skills to learn, and none of them are too difficult.   I'd venture that any one of them given a week of practice, skill level can be dramatically increased.   Of the whole list, vibrato first, string bending, then learning to use a slide... those three will make all the difference in the world.

BTW, if you notice videos of pro-players, they use 3 fingers to bend a string, and they don't play around about it.   I learned that from watching a Pink Floyd video.   They don't bend strings.... they BEND strings.  :D


Well I now able to do at least 3 of them. thanks for your tips still learning.
Wayfinder said:

Bwahahahaa...

Over the decades have tried pretty much all of these... and many guitarists use them on a regular basis.  I don't think I'd have had the courage to try them in front of anyone on the first attemp; I prefer to practice in private and even performances (although I've done many) tend to make me nervous (I become hyper and over-talkative during performances-- the opposite of stage fright-- so I avoid them).   But you gave your friends some entertainment and fun laughing at (I prefer with) you... so you brought joy to people in the attempt.   And you'll improve with practice.  Win/win.

The tricks themselves come easy to some folks not so easy to others.  Almost all of them have degrees of skill.  For example, almost anyone can slide, but learning to slide well and knowing the best time to slide, that's another thing. But of all the CBG tricks, learning to use a slide well is in my opinion one of the most valuable if one wants that Delta Swamp sound.

Hammering, yeah that's a neat effect.  Easy to do, tricky to know when and how to do at the proper time. But once ya learn to hammer it opens up a whole new area of music.  The article talks about hammering with the right hand; hammering (or tapping) with the left hand on a good, sensitive guitar is even more valuable.  I've seen people play entire song sections with only the left (chording) hand, never picking a note with their right one.   That's not gonna happen on the first try. ;D

Octave skipping we do all the time; it's just that most players (except music theorists) never think about what they're doing.   6-string guitar tuning is actually designed to make both octave skipping and 3-5-7 combos easier.   One can octave skip on a CBG easily because with GDg tuning, two of the strings are already an octave apart.

Vibrato I use all the time, especially on slow or blues songs-- to the point I rarely (if ever) use a vibrato bar (even though most of my regular gits have one). 

String bending... awesome for CBG and 6-string alike, especially if one uses light-gauge strings (I recommend 9s instead of 10s, and definitely nothing above... too much work and hard on the fingertips).   Again it's a matter of where and when, but this kind of thing is really what makes a stringed instrument so much more versatile than say, a digital organ.  When we think about it, saxophonists "bend" notes all the time; that's what makes them sound good. 

Anyhow back to the question:    Have I tried all these?  Over the years, yes.   Did I master them first try?  Some of them came easy, some of them I don't really use to this day.    But I have to say it's a pretty good list of skills to learn, and none of them are too difficult.   I'd venture that any one of them given a week of practice, skill level can be dramatically increased.   Of the whole list, vibrato first, string bending, then learning to use a slide... those three will make all the difference in the world.

BTW, if you notice videos of pro-players, they use 3 fingers to bend a string, and they don't play around about it.   I learned that from watching a Pink Floyd video.   They don't bend strings.... they BEND strings.  :D

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