Handmade Music Clubhouse

Cigar Box Guitar Headquarters - CBG HQ

Thanks for the birthday greeting. At 72 and a -- till now at least -- total failure in the music instrument department, I am still looking for an instrument to sing with. I like the sound of the acoustic guitar best, but I don't think I will ever learn it. Ditto for virtually all instruments. My latest attempts are with the didgeridoo (also handmade) and djembe (not handmade), but it's hard to sing with the didge! Maybe it's possible with the djembe, but I have not been able to find anything on the web to encourage me. It should not be that difficult, but that's what I thought about the guitar too. Ah hell I guess taping your foot is as good accompaniment as you need.

Views: 67

Replies to This Discussion

Why not try a lop pedal, you could record some simple percussion, may be a  few easy cords, check it out & make music! Good luck, Martin.

Have you tried a ukulele? Ukes are easy on the head and the fingers, and there are plenty of really easy songs to get you started. For ex., Google or check on YouTube for “one chord ukulele songs,” or some other variant of “beginning ukulele”.

My own preference is for a baritone ukulele, tho' YMMV.

Thanks, Martin. I had never heard of a loop pedal, much less tried it, but I have GarageBand (Mac computer) and I think you can do stuff like that if you can figure it out how to use it.

martin baker said:

Why not try a lop pedal, you could record some simple percussion, may be a  few easy cords, check it out & make music! Good luck, Martin.

Thanks, Jim. I've thought about it but I don't much like the sound.of the ukelele. I've also tried open tuning on the guitar, but that's not as easy as it sounds. Another thing I've tried is just playing "normal" chords but omitting (stuffing cotton under!) the first (lower) three strings, which makes the fingering much easier, but the sound is of course higher in pitch than I like it. (What I like about the guitar is the resonance of the lower strings with my voice.)  What I have not tried is putting the three low strings where the three higher strings are supposed to go, so you'd have a 3-string guitar with low G-B-E that you could play with simplified "normal" chord fingering. Has anybody tried that? Or how about doing that with a small (3/4 or 1/2) guitar that would have a narrower neck but you could put low G-B-E where E-D-E normally go. This sounds like what people are doing here with their cigar boxes, but wouldn't it be possible with a normal guitar?

Jim N. said:

Have you tried a ukulele? Ukes are easy on the head and the fingers, and there are plenty of really easy songs to get you started. For ex., Google or check on YouTube for “one chord ukulele songs,” or some other variant of “beginning ukulele”.

My own preference is for a baritone ukulele, tho' YMMV.

Michael, sure, just like the first three strings on a baritone ukulele. Bari's (bigger and lower-voiced than plinky-sounding soprano, etc., ukes) are tuned DGBE, just like the 1st four strings on regular guitar.

Ex:
“Feelin' Bad Blues” played on a baritone uke:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x7M0DKdcFTU

Thanks, Jim. I'll try it.

But what if you replaced the three highest strings on the guitar (GBE) with the three lowest strings (EAD) and tuned them to GBE? 

To answer my own question, I tried this with open tuning to (low) G and D and it works. A lot easier than trying to bar all 6 strings, and if you just play the power chords it's better than nothing!

Michael Morrissey said:

But what if you replaced the three highest strings on the guitar (GBE) with the three lowest strings (EAD) and tuned them to GBE? 

I agree with Jim N.  Or maybe a bass uke if your voice is as low as mine.  Although, it is a bass, not really a lead instrument like a guitar.  Good luck.

Michael Morrissey said:

Thanks, Jim. I'll try it.

RSS

© 2018   Created by Ted Crocker.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service